Author Archive

The “U18-18040000” error and how to solve it

December 22, 2010  |   kb   |     |   0 Comment

The “U18-18040000” error and how to solve it

The Panasonic KV-S3065C scanner is a great workhorse of a scanner. It just keeps going, and going, and going... ... until an error occurs. The scanner then stops scanning and announces it has a paper jam. Most of the time, it actually is a paper jam. Jam is cleared and scanning continues merrily along. Sometimes it is not so easy. The scanner is convinced there is a jam, but there is no paper in the scanner. Experienced users know that there is some dust on one of the several paper sensors in the scanner; strategic blasts of compressed air is often enough to get the scanner cooperating again. Sometimes, the Panasonic KV-S3065C scanner still thinks there is paper in it. The user utility says the error code is U18 18040000, and the scanner just doesn't want to work. The U18 class of error codes basically mean "there is probably a paper jam, or probably not, but in any case one of the sensors thinks there is paper where there shouldn't be." The 04 part means the sensor in question is the rear ending sensor. Great! There is just one rub: Where the heck is this rear ending sensor. Recall that this scanner can drop scanned pages ...

Connecting a scanner to your PC: USB or SCSI?

August 23, 2010  |   Blog,Scanners   |     |   0 Comment

Connecting a scanner to your PC: USB or SCSI?

Some scanners on the market offer two ways to connect to a personal computer: Either they can do so via USB or via SCSI. At My Efact, we overwhelmingly recommend the use of USB. The key here is availability: We believe that your scanner is less likely to be down for extended periods with USB instead of SCSI, for several reasons: Ease of maintenance: SCSI is hard to manage. One needs to know about archaic details such as SCSI IDs and proper termination. Some IT professionals may not be familiar enough with SCSI to get your scanner up and running quickly. That delay results in downtime. In contrast, USB is easy to manage. Every IT professional and most tech-savvy office employees can easily diagnose and correct USB problems. Scanner downtime is minimized. Availability: SCSI cables and SCSI terminators are hard to find and expensive. If you have a bad SCSI cable, be prepared for a trip to a far-away specialty store, or wait for UPS to deliver a new one. In contrast, USB cables can be found inexpensively at any office supply store; many offices even have USB cables on-hand. If you have a bad USB cable, spend a few minutes to hook ...